So, Was The Eclipse All It Was Cracked Up To Be?

In case you haven't noticed, much of the world has spent the day gleefully reveling in full-blown Eclipse Madness. But now that the blessed event is behind us, it's time to reflect. Here are some of the best photos and occurances from this once-in-a-century event.

Takeshi Kuboki / Flickr

The most WTF moment of the eclipse was undoubtedly when US President Donald Trump looked directly at the sun, retinal damage be damned. Yep. This really happened.

As you'd expect, many Americans attempting to reach the narrow 70-mile band of best observation ended up getting stuck in terrible eclipse traffic. A bunch more were left waiting in an endless line for the elevator to the roof of their building. (Our Lifehacker colleagues in the US can attest to this.)

Below you will find a selection of photos from the event. Enjoy!

ST LOUIS, MO - AUGUST 21: Students at the Jennings School District view the solar eclipse with glasses donated by Mastercard on August 21, 2017 in St Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Jeff Curry/Getty Images for Mastercard)
JACKSON, WY - AUGUST 21: (EDITORS NOTE: Multiple exposures were combined to digitally increase the exposure latitude of this image.) The sun is just coming out of full eclipse over Grand Teton National Park on August 21, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. Thousands of people have flocked to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - AUGUST 21: A spectator looks skyward during the partial solar eclipse at peak time on August 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Chelsea Guglielmino/WireImage)
ISLE OF PALMS, SC - AUGUST 21: Solar eclipse watchers were ecstatic as the clouds broke minutes before totality during the total solar eclipse from the one of last vantage points where totality will be visible on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, S.C.. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. The total solar eclipse on June 8, 1918, crossed the States from Washington to Florida. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21: The moon begins to eclipse the sun above the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
The total eclipse of the sun as viewed from onboard Virgin Atlantic Boeing 787 Dreamliner flight VS5 from London's Heathrow airport to Miami, while flying over the United States. (Photo by Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images)
CARBONDALE, IL - AUGUST 21: The moon eclipses the sun above the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
NASHVILLE, TN - AUGUST 21: SiriusXM Host Storme Warren poses with guests Antoinette Roubin and Kenny Jost, who got engaged to be married during totality at SiriusXM The Highway's Live Broadcast of the Solar Eclipse at FGL House on August 21, 2017 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Jason Davis/Getty Images for SiriusXM)
ST LOUIS, MO - AUGUST 21: Students at the Jennings School District view the solar eclipse with glasses donated by Mastercard on August 21, 2017 in St Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Jeff Curry/Getty Images for Mastercard)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 21: The moon partially eclipses the Sun during a Solar eclipse over the United States as seen from the National Mall on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 21: (EDITORS NOTE: This image has been converted to black and white.) A lens flare during the Solar eclipse over the United States as seen from the National Mall on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
AMITY, OR - AUGUST 21: The solar eclipse reaches totality on August 21, 2017 in Amity, Oregon. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina. (Photo by Chris Weeks/Getty Images)

Let us know in the comments how you spent the eclipse, and if you think it lived up to the hype.

Additional reporting by Virginia K. Smith.

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Comments

    We of the fire nation had a terrible time. 1/10

    Wasn't in a spot with complete totality (around 92% here in Seattle) but the weather was completely clear so it was quite visible and pretty cool for the 15 or so minutes when you could see it. Certainly the most eclipsed I've seen the sun - was too far south for the one in Australia in 2013 to see much of it (and that wasn't a total eclipse anyway) and the one in New Zealand in 1986 when I was really young was about the same.

    Once in a century event? It's at least the 10th total eclipse this century, if you acknowledge the parts of the world outside of the USA.

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